Tuesday, August 7, 2012

The Wild Princess by Mary Hart Perry

An intriguing look at the feisty daughter of Queen Victoria! 

Book Description: 
Four of the five daughters of England's Queen Victoria and Prince Albert were regal, genteel, and everything a princess should be. But one was rebellious, scandalous, and untamed.

This is her story. . . .

To the court and subjects of Queen Victoria, young Princess Louise—later the Duchess of Argyll—was the "Wild One." Proud and impetuous, she fought the constraints placed on her and her brothers and sisters, dreamed of becoming an artist, and broke with a three-hundred-year-old tradition by marrying outside of the privileged circle of European royals. Some said she wed for love. Others whispered of a scandal covered up by the Crown. It will take a handsome American, recruited by the queen's elite Secret Service, to discover the truth. But even as Stephen Byrne—code name the Raven—vows to risk his life to protect the royal family from violent Irish radicals, he tempts Louise with a forbidden love that could prove just as dangerous.

In the vein of Philippa Gregory, Mary Hart Perry tells the riveting story of an extraordinary woman—a princess who refused to give up on her dreams, including her right to true love.

Book Review:


Princess Louise


Queen Victoria and Prince Albert

Princess Louise was the daughter of Queen Victoria and Prince Albert. She was their 6th child and 4th daughter. Because Louise was born at a time when numerous revolutions were taking place in Europe, Queen Victoria believed Louise would be "peculiar".


Princess Louise is the infant on the right next to the eldest child

And this proved very true. Of all Victoria's children, Louise was the most unconventional, dubbed the wild child. She wanted to be normal and did not flaunt her noble status. This made relations between her and her mother often strained. The more Queen Victoria tried to control her, the more she fought back. 

As always, when reading historical fiction, fiction is weaved with fact. In the case of this novel, the author followed Louise's life closely, except for the romance with Stephen. Stephen is a stetson wearing, American body guard who works for Queen Victoria and her family, and a complete fictional character. However, readers will find that most of the story line is remarkably accurate and true to the times.

Louise is depicted as wilful, imaginative, feisty, and self-confident. And definitely a true beauty! It was refreshing to see how Louise viewed her life as restricted and smothering. She envied others for being able to walk freely about in public or go to whatever schools is preferred. The imagery and descriptions of surroundings was very well writen, as was the characterization. The author writes with plenty of emotion and does an excellent job of bringing Princess Louise to life.
 
The Wild Princess is one of a series of novels the author is writing about the daughters of Queen Victoria. Unique and compelling, I thoroughly enjoyed this book and eagerly await the next novel to be released.


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