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Showing posts from March, 2010

Wordless Wednesday - Portrait of Countess Michael Karolyi

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Portrait of Countess Michael Karolyi by John Quincy Adams (1874-1933) I LOVE COMMENTS

Wordless Wednesday - Anna Alma Tadema

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Portrait of Anna Alma Tadema daughter of Sir Lawrence Alma-Tadema

A brief history of Gummi Candy

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The first gummi candi was invented by a man named Hans Riegel during the 1920s. Riegel owned a German candy company called Haribo. Gummi candy made its debut in North America in 1982. The gummi worm, 2 inches in length, was made by another German gummi candy manufacturer called Trolli. Ever since Gummi worms are the most popular gummi candy ever made. Gummi candy is made with edible gelatin which gives it elasticity, the desired chewy consistency, and a longer shelf life. Gelatin is not new. It has been in use since the time of the Egyptian Pharaohs. The ingredients of gummi candies are simple. Corn starch, corn syrup, sugar, gelatin, color, and flavor. The ingredients are mixed and pumped into a coil candy cooker approximately 128 feet long made of stainless steel that cooks the candy by steam outside of the coil. When it's done cooking the cooker pumps the gummi into a vacuum chamber where excess moisture is removed. AFter the vacuum chamber the candy moves to a mixing

Heloise (1101 - 1162)

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Heloise was completely unlike my perceptions of what medieval women were like. I was under the impression that the women of this time period were weak in spirit, obedient, and usually chaste. I did expect that some women might have engaged in pre-marital sex, but I thought that these women would have regarded such behavior as a disgrace. Heloise completely changed my misconceptions of medieval women; she seems more like a twentieth century woman in her strength and personal characteristics. While Heloise did succumb to her husband’s, Abelard, desire for her to join a convent, this action of Heloise’s does not exhibit weakness but rather is an indication of her innate strength. I believe a weak woman would have found another man, since Abelard was now unable to satisfy a woman physically. In joining the convent, Heloise proves that she was not a slave to human desires but was a slave, perhaps, to the man she loved unconditionally. This kind of love that Heloise had for Abelard is one

Wordless Wednesday - Distant Thoughts

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Distant Thoughts by John Absolon (1815-1895) I LOVE COMMENTS

Wordless Wednesday - Portrait of Countess Michael Karolyi

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Portrait of Countess Michael Karolyi by John Quincy Adams (1874-1933)

Ancient Home in Nazareth

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Sacred Sunday - Reliquary Saint Scholastica

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Forearm bone of Saint Scholastica  

Margaret Mitchell (1900 - 1949)

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Margaret Mitchell Author I was born in Atlanta, Georgia to Eugene Mitchell, a lawyer, and Mary Isabelle, much referred to as Maybelle, a suffragist of Irish Catholic origin.  My brother, Stephens, was four years my senior.  My childhood was spent in the laps of Civil War veterans and of my maternal relatives, who had lived through the Civil War. After graduating from Washington Seminary, I attended Smith College, but withdrew during my freshman year in 1918.  I returned to Atlanta to take over the household after my mother's death earlier that year from the great Spanish flu pandemic of 1918. Shortly afterward, I defied the conventions of my class and times by taking a job at the Atlanta Journal. Under the name Peggy Mitchell I wrote a weekly column for the newspaper's Sunday edition, thereby making my mark as one of the first female columnists at the South's largest newspaper.  My first professional writing assignment was an interview with an Atlanta socialite, whose

Wordless Wednesday - Le Printemps

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  Le Printemps William Adolphe Bouguereau 1858    

Wordless Wednesday - Portrait of Felicitas Seiler

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Portrait of Felicitas Seiler by Christoph Amberger (1505-1562)   I LOVE COMMENTS

Queen Eadgyth (910 - 26 January 946)

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For an author of historical fiction, nothing is more gratifying or exciting than one of your characters returning to life or to the world today. Anyone who knows me, can tell you that I've been busy at work writing a novel about Queen Mechthild, the first queen of Germany in the 10th century. It is suspected that the tomb and bones of Eadgyth, the granddaugher of Alfred the Great and sister to King Athelstan, has recently been rediscovered in a grave in Magdeburg Germany, her remains intact.  According to my research, she was indeed buried there, as was her husband, Otto the Great, son of Queen Mechthild and King Heinrich the Fowler. Authorities will be verifying her DNA. The discovery of the tomb was made during a wider research project into the cathedral in 2008 by a German team. Researchers originally thought the tomb was a cenotaph, but when they removed the lid they discovered the lead coffin which bore her name, Queen Eadgyth, and accurately recorded the date - 1

Sacred Sunday - Tomb of Saint Leontia

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  Tomb of Saint Leontia San Francesco a Ripa Church Rome, Italy  

Sarah Helen Power Whitman (1803 - 1878)

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Sarah Helen Power Whitman 1803 - 1878 Occultist Transcendentalist Writer I was born in Providence, Rhode Island on January 19, 1803, exactly six years before Edgar Allan Poe was born.  In 1828, I married the poet and writer John Winslow Whitman.  John had been co-editor of the Boston Spectator and Ladies' Album, which allowed me to publish some of my poetry using the name "Helen".  My husband died in 1833.  We never had any children together. I had a heart condition that I treated with ether which I breathed in through my handkerchief. I was a good friend of Margaret Fuller and other intellectuals in New England.  I became interested in transcendentalism through this social group and after hearing Ralph Waldo Emerson lecture in Boston, Massachusetts and in Providence. I also became interested in science, mesmerism, and the occult.  I had a penchant for wearing black and a coffin-shaped charm around my neck and practiced séances in my home on Sundays, attemp

Wordless Wednesday - The Suitor

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The Suitor by Louis Emile Adan 1839 - 1937     I LOVE COMMENTS

Matilda of Flanders

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Matilda of Flanders (1031 - 1083) Queen consort of the English Duchess consort of the Normans My true name is Maud Le-Vieux, but I was crowned Matilda of Flanders.  I was Queen consort of the Kingdom of England and the wife of William I the Conqueror. I was the daughter of Baldwin V, Count of Flanders, and Adèle (1000-1078/9), daughter of Robert II of France. I was extremely short of stature and gained fame as being England's smallest queen. When the representative of William, Duke of Normandy (later king of England as William the Conqueror), came to ask for my hand in marriage, I replied that I was far too high-born (being descended from King Alfred the Great of England) to consider marrying a bastard. When that was repeated to William, he rode from Normandy to Bruges, found me on my way to church, dragged me off my horse by my long braids, threw me down in the street in front of my flabbergasted attendants, and then rode off.  Naturally my father took offense at

Wordless Wednesday - Portrait of Felicitas Seiler

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Portrait of Felicitas Seiler by Christoph Amberger (1505-1562) I LOVE COMMENTS

Wordless Wednesday - The New Shawl

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The New Shawl by Louis Emile Adan (1839-1937)   I LOVE COMMENTS

Sentence of Marriage by Shayne Parkinson

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Sentence of Marriage is the first of three books of the saga Promises to Keep by Shayne Parkinson , which takes us to New Zealand, 1880. Twelve-year-old Amy lives on a farm and dreams of becoming a teacher and work in a big city. However, her dreams are thwarted when her father brings a new wife to be stepmother to Amy and her two brothers. Amy, who has lost her mother far too soon, lives on a farm in New Zealand. She has big dreams which are nurtured by the village’s teacher. Although her father is not pleased, she aims to become a teacher, too. When she loses her grandmother, she cannot pursue her dreams any further, but must run the household. She manages well until one day, her father returns with Susannah, his new wife, from a trip to Auckland. Susannah loathes the hard farm life and especially Amy. When Susannah’s brother James comes to spent the summer, love spins Amy’s life out of control. Shayne Parkinson allows us to acquaint ourselves with Amy and her world graduall