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Showing posts from February, 2010

Anginetti

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Lemon Drop Cookies (Anginetti)   This recipe I have made on numerous occasions.  I sometimes substitute almond extract in lieu of the lemon.  They always turn out great.   3 eggs 1/2 cup milk 2 teaspoons lemon extract 1/2 cup sugar 1/2 cup vegetable oil 3 cups flour 3 teaspoons baking powder Preheat oven to 350 degrees. In an electric mixer on medium speed, beat eggs, milk, lemon extract, sugar and oil until well blended. On low speed, add flour and baking powder.  Mix until just blended.  The dough should be soft and sticky. Lightly dust the dough and your fingers with a little additional flour. Drop the dough from a teaspoon onto a lightly greased cookie sheet, spacing the cookies 2 inches apart. Bake immediately for 8 to 10 minutes or until slightly browned. Remove cookie sheet from oven.  Using a metal spatula, remove cookies from sheet onto wire racks. Cool on wire rack. Frost with Lemon Confectioner's Frosting.  If it is necessary to freeze cookies, use heavy-duty plastic f

Zelda Fitzgerald (1900 - 1948)

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Zelda Fitzgerald The Woman behind the Artist (1900 - 1948) Author Dancer Now on virtually all high school reading lists, F. Scott Fitzgerald’s novels, especially The Great Gatsby, were initially commercial failures. Although we now consider Fitzgerald one of America’s greatest writers, he died young, penniless, and forgotten, until scholarly research revived his writing and reputation almost half a century later. But, what most don’t know is that his wife, Zelda Fitzgerald, was also a writer--or at least an aspiring one. Zelda and F. Scott Fitzgerald Zelda Sayre Fitzgerald began writing her first book while being treated for schizophrenia at the Phipps Clinic of John Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore. Zelda finished writing her almost entirely autobiographical novel, Save Me the Waltz, in a two-month manic frenzy. She sent her manuscript to the renowned literary editor Maxwell Perkins. Scott read the book after Zelda sent it out, and he was furious. He had

Wordless Wednesday - Bolsena

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Bolsena Italy  

Wordless Wednesday - Constance Monti Perticari

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  Constance Monti Perticari by Fillippo Agricola (1776-1857)   I LOVE COMMENTS

Giuseppina Pollari Terranova

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Josephine Pullare Terranova (April 21 1889 - July 16, 1981)was born in San Stefano, Sicily but immigrated to New York City with her widowed mother.  After years of sexual abuse at the hands of her aunt and uncle, she stabbed them to death and was brought to trial on double murder chargesl.  But the trial itself took an absurd turn when she was put through a battery of tests to see if she was sane enough to stand trial for murder.  The experts shot electricity through her body, jabbed needles into her cheeks, hit her ankles with steel and dropped rocks on her toes.  She pleaded with them to let her return to the Tombs.  She was steadfast in declaring she was neither crazy nor afraid.  Many New Yorkers were horrified at what the young teenage girl was made to endure. The jury acquitted her in what was widely regarded as an act of jury nullification. She later moved west and finally settled in the San Francisco Bay Area, allegedly with the financial assistance of William Randolph He

Almond Puffs

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This has got to be the most popular recipe I own. I've made it for wedding and baby showers, family get togethers, and pot luck dinners. Every time I do, I get asked for the recipe by just about everyone there. I think the almond puffs look difficult and fancy, but in reality, they are deceivingly simple. These are not freezable and are terrible keepers. So when you make them, ensure you use them the same day or even the next. Ingredients: Bottom layer: 1/2 cup butter softened 1 cup flour 2 tablespoons water Middle layer: 1/2 cup butter 1 cup water 1 teaspoon almond extract 1 cup flour 3 eggs Confectioner's Sugar Glaze 1 1/2 cups icing sugar 2 tablespoons butter, softened 1 1/2 teaspoons almond extract 1 or 2 teaspoons warm water Chopped almonds Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Cut 1/2 cup butter into 1 cup flour. Sprinkle 2 tablespoons water over the mixture. Mix with a fork. Round into a ball. Divide in half. On an ungreased baking sheet, form eac

Adelina Patti (1843 - 1919)

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Adelina Patti 1843 - 1919 Opera Singer Diva When it comes to opera, I was one of the most highly regarded female singers of the 19th century.  I earned exorbitant fees at the height of my career and was considered one of the most famous sopranos in history due to the beauty of my lyric voice and the unsurpassed quality of my bel canto technique. Giuseppe Verdi, wold famous composer, called me the greatest vocalist that he ever heard. I was the youngest child of tenor Salvatore Patti (1800–1869) and soprano Caterina Barilli (died 1870).  My Italian parents were both working in Madrid, Spain, at the time.  My elder sisters, Amalia and Carlotta Patti were also singers.  My family moved to New York City when I was a young child.  I grew up in the Wakefield section of the Bronx.  To this day, my family's home still stands.  Age 15 My professional singing career began in childhood where I developed into a coloratura soprano.  I learned much of my singing technique from my brother

Queen Mary I (1516 - 1558)

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I was born in England 1516.  I was the child of King Henry VIII and Catherine of Aragon. I spoke Latin, Italian, French, Spanish, Greek and was tutored in science and music. In 1547, my father died and my half brother Edward VI assumed the throne as England's first Protestant monarch. Edward VI I did not wish to convert and practiced my Roman Catholic faith in private in my own chapel.  Edward discovered this and ordered me to immediately cease and desist.  I appealed to my cousin, Emperor Charles V who came to my aid.  He threatened to declare war against England if they continued to deny my rights to practice my faith. This worked and I was allowed to worship, but always in private. Charles V In 1553, while I was staying at Framlingham Castle in Suffolk, Edward died.  In his will, he tried unsuccessfully to exclude me and my half sister Elizabeth from the line of succession of the throne of England. His attempt failed and because was next in line, I assumed the thron

Wordless Wednesday - A Song of Springtime 1913

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A Song of Springtime John Waterhouse 1913

Wordless Wednesday - Mangia Maccheroni

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  Old Neopolitan Postcard Mangiamaccheroni Circa 1800's  

1850 Vampire Killing Kit

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Recently, vampire killing kits have begun to resurface, no doubt due to the popularity stirred up by the Twilight series of novels. The kits were put together in Boston in 1850's. They are beautifully crafted, elegant in their trappings and come complete with stake and holy water and sometimes a pistol. The kits are reportedly produced a man by the name of Professor Ernst Blomberg.  Several of these kits have surfaced recently, many selling at auction between $12,000 and $20,000. One such kit is described at the Museum of Supernatural History website: "The Vampire Killing Kit was sold by Professor Ernst Blomberg in the second half of the 19th century. The kit was made by Nicolas Plomdeur, a well-known gunmaker from Li├Ęge.  This particular box, which has been in the Surnateum's collection since the late 19th century, has recently been reunited with the accompanying pistol (made in Spain in the late 18th century, originally a flintlock but later converted to a percussi

Marguerite Pitre

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Marguerite Pitre Unknown - January 9, 1953) Murderess Marguerite Pitre had the misfortune of meeting Joseph Albert Guay through her brother, Generoux Ruest, who was an employee of the notorious Mr. Guay. Joseph Albert Guay was born in Quebec in 1917. As the youngest of 5 children, he was the center of attention. In his youth, he sold watches and jewellery and worked solely on commission. Being the spoiled youngest child of his family, he was used to having his way, so he evolved into a very tenacious successful salesman. In 1939, at the start of World War II, he got a job at Canadian Arsenals Limited at St. Malo, Quebec. While working there, he met and married Rita Morel. It was a very happy marriage at first, full of love and brimming with joy. Then, Rita gave birth to their first child. The honeymoon was over, for Joseph did not like playing second fiddle to an infant. He worked at the Canadian Arsenals until the arsenal closed in 1945. That's when he returned to what he