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Showing posts from January, 2010

Mary Jemison (1743 - 1833)

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I was born to Thomas and Jane Jemison aboard the ship William and Mary in the fall of 1743 while en route from Northern Ireland to America.  Upon our arrival in America, my parents joined other Irish American immigrants and headed west from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania to what was then the western frontier (now central Pennsylvania) and squatted on territory that was under the authority of the Iroquois Confederacy. During the time my parents were establishing our home, the French and Indian War was raging. One morning in 1755, a capturing party consisting of six Shawnee Indians and four Frenchmen captured me, my family (except for my two older brothers) and Davy Wheelock a boy from another family.  On route to Fort Duquesne (where the Allegheny and Monongahela Rivers meet to create the Ohio River in modern-day Pittsburgh), my mother, father, and siblings were killed and scalped.  I and the other young boy were spared.  Once the party reached the Fort, I was given to two Seneca Indian

Wordless Wednesday - Flaming June

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Flaming June   Lord Frederick Leighton   I LOVE COMMENTS

Eugenia of Rome

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The best of scriptwriters would be hard pressed to match, let alone exceed, my true to life story. It is said that I resorted to what might have been called excesses. At a time when society confined most women to the home, I expressed my independence with such resourcefulness that I showed myself not only the equal to any man, but better than most. My name is Eugenia, which is the Greek word for noble, an adjective that falls short of describing me astounding character, one that seldom is attained by either sex. I was born in 280 A.D., the daughter of the Duke of Alexandria, Egypt, whose name was Philip and who ruled in the name of the emperor in the land of Pharaohs. I enjoyed every privilege, except that reserved for men, who were free to choose their way of life. A woman of high or low rank could no more wear the churchman scowl than a warrior's armor. I was not born a Christian but was converted in my youth without the knowledge of my parents who were strongly opposed to th

Weekend Chef - Pasta con Piselli

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I decided to start posting an Italian recipe every Friday for those of us courageous enough to venture into the kitchen. Some recipes will be from my secret family collection. Others may be recipes I will try that particular weekend. So if you'd like to try the recipes out with me, I'd love to hear your comments. Here's my first recipe. This one is a tried and true family favourite. Enjoy. Pasta Con Piselli This is one recipe that I make often. No matter what changes I make to it or what I add to it, it always tastes great. 1 medium chopped onion 4 cloves minced garlic 1/2 cup extra virgin olive oil Ham Peas 1/4 cup butter 1 cup broth Pasta Saute onion and garlic in olive oil and butter Add ham, peas, and broth. Simmer for 15 to 20 minutes or until the pasta finishes cooking. Toss onto cooked pasta.  

Wordless Wednesday - Sandro Botticelli

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The Birth of Venus Sandro Botticelli Painted sometime between 1482 - 1486

Wordless Wednesday - A Coign of Vantage

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A Coign of Vantage Sir Alma Tadema 1895 I LOVE COMMENTS

Lucy Maud Montgomery (1873 - 1942)

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Lucy Maud Montgomery MacDonald (1874-1942) is one of Canada's best known and most enduring authors. Her family always called her “Maud”. She was born on November 30, 1874, in Clifton, Prince Edward Island. Her father, Hugh Montgomery, was a former sea captain who later became a merchant. Her mother was Clara Macneill Montgomery born of a large and prominent family in Prince Edward Island. Clara died when Maud was two years old. Stricken by grief, and unable to care for his toddler daughter, her father sent Maud to live with her strict and elderly maternal grandparents at their isolated farmhouse in Cavendish, Prince Edward Island. Young Maud was a lonely child, perceptive, creative, and a little out of her element living with her Presbyterian grandparents. She lost herself in books and loved to read Dickens, Scott, Byron, and Longfellow. She wrote stories and poems in her leisure from a very early age. Maud loved to spend time with her cousins and school chums. In 1890, a

Typhoid Mary - Mary Mallon (1869 - 1938)

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Of all the terrible fates to befall an ordinary person, mine was the worst. It ruined my life. Like millions before me, I immigrated to the United States of America to seek a better life. Instead, for 26 years, I lived on an isolated island, shunned by the world. My plight begins shortly after my arrival in New York. I arrived in America from Ireland in 1869 at the age of 15. I was a very tall, big boned girl, sturdy of build, strong, and very healthy. I was never afraid of hard work, as long as it did not pertain to housekeeping, something I could not abide. Though I never received formal training, I excelled as a cook and found I could easily earn a living at it. Mostly, I cooked at private residences for wealthy families. In the summer of 1906, I cooked for the family of a wealthy New York banker. They rented a large house surrounded by ample grounds in a desirable part of the village of Oyster Bay for the summer. This is where my troubles began. Shortly after my arrival, 6 of

Adelina Patti (1843 - 1919)

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Adelina Patti 1843 - 1919 Opera Singer Diva When it comes to opera, Adelina Patti (February 10, 1843 – September 27, 1919) was one of the most highly regarded female singers of the 19th century.  She earned exorbitant fees at the height of her career. She is considered one of the most famous sopranos in history due to the beauty of her lyric voice and the unsurpassed quality of her bel canto technique. Giuseppe Verdi, wold famous composer, called her the greatest vocalist that he ever heard. Adelina was the youngest child of tenor Salvatore Patti (1800–1869) and soprano Caterina Barilli (died 1870).  Her Italian parents were both working in Madrid, Spain, at the time.  Her elder sisters, Amalia and Carlotta Patti were also singers.  Adelina and her family moved to New York City when she was a young child.  She grew up in the Wakefield section of the Bronx.  To this day, her family's home still stands.  Age 15 Her professional singing career began in

Jeanne Baret (1740 - 1803)

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Jeanne Baret 1740 - 1803 Adventurer World Traveler They say that the life of a sailor is for men only. They say that a woman aboard ship brings bad luck. Well, I disproved all that. I was born into a life of poverty and was desperate to escape hardship, starvation, and a forced life of prostitution. Instead, hungry for adventure, I dressed myself as a man and changed my name to Jean Bar√©.  I worked as a valet for a gentleman in Paris.  I learned about two ships that were leaving for the South Pacific from Nantes. While the ships were being provisioned, I enlisted as a valet and assistant to the expedition's naturalist and boarded the ships La Boudeuse and √Čtoile under the command of Louis Antoine de Bougainville 1766. The excursion was to last three years. The French Frigate La Boudeuse I became an expert botanist who cheerfully accompanied the botanist on some of the most dangerous, troublesome excursions over rugged terrain through jungles, forests, and swamps

King Abdullah's Tomb

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King Abdullah’s Tomb, by Linda and Gary Cargill, is an adventurous, plot-driven novel that starts on the ill-fated 1915 voyage of the RMS Lusitania. The protagonist of the story is one Dora Benley, a sharply intelligent girl with an inquisitive mind and an observant nature. Dora and her parents are traveling on the British ocean liner, whose departure is plagued by a series of threats from the Germans. The young girl spies a mysterious man rummaging through other people’s luggage and connects him to a series of suspicious events onboard, the least of which is an attack on her cabin itself. Unfortunately for her, curiosity does not come without a price. The stranger is convinced that Dora is hiding an object of great value, one he will not hesitate to kill over. With the help of a few friends, Dora escapes from his clutches, only to find that the Lusitania has been torpedoed by the Germans. But that’s only where the story begins. As Dora tries to adjust to a new life after surviving he

Love Letter - Catherine of Aragon to Henry VIII

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Catherine of Aragon (1485 - 1536) had the dubious honor of being the first of eight wives to Henry VIII.  She bore one child - a daughter, Mary, who became Queen of England. But in his desire to bear an heir, King Henry divorced her in 1533.  Throughout the divorce and for a long time afterward, Catherine remained steadfastly devoted to Henry until her death in 1536, as this letter clearly demonstrates. 1535 My Lord and Dear Husband, I commend me unto you. The hour of my death draweth fast on, and my case being such, the tender love I owe you forceth me, with a few words, to put you in remembrance of the health and safeguard of your soul, which you ought to prefer before all worldly matters, and before the care and tendering of your own body, for the which you have cast me into many miseries and yourself into many cares. For my part I do pardon you all, yea, I do wish and devoutly pray God that He will also pardon you. For the rest I commend unto you Mary, our daughter, beseeching you

Fannie Farmer (1857 - 1915)

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Fannie Farmer 1857 - 1915 Author Healer I was born in Medford, Massachusetts, USA, to Mary Watson Merritt and John Franklin Farmer, an editor and printer. Although I was the oldest of four daughters, born in a family that highly valued education and that expected me to go to college, I suffered a paralytic stroke at the age of 16 while attending Medford High School. I could not continue my formal academic education; for several years, I was unable to walk and remained in my parents' care at home. During this time, I took up cooking, eventually turning my mother's home into a boarding house that developed a reputation for the quality of the meals it served. By the age of 30, Farmer, I could walk again, but not wthout a substantial limp that never left me. I enrolled in the Boston Cooking School and trained there 1889 during the height of the domestic science movement, learning what were then considered the most critical elements of the science, including nutrition and